Amelia Who?

Ever heard of Amelia Bloomer? She was a women’s rights activist in the 1800’s and the namesake of a fabulous children’s literature award. Here are just a few of the books that were acknowledged by the Amelia Bloomer Project for excellence in portraying significant feminist content in quality children’s books. You can check out the entire list at www.ameliabloomer.wordpress.com

Happy Reading!

Image result for swimming with sharks heather lang

Before Eugenie Clark’s groundbreaking research, most people thought sharks were vicious, blood-thirsty killers. From the first time she saw a shark in an aquarium, Japanese-American Eugenie was enthralled. Instead of frightening and ferocious eating machines, she saw sleek, graceful fish gliding through the water. After she became a scientist—an unexpected career path for a woman in the 1940s—she began taking research dives and training sharks, earning her the nickname “The Shark Lady.”

Image result for miss colfax's light

In 1861, at the age of 37, Harriet Colfax took on the job of lighthouse keeper for the Michigan City lighthouse off Lake Michigan. It was a bold and determined endeavor, especially since there were very few female lighthouse keepers in the country at that time. For 43 years, until the age of 80, Harriet kept her light burning, through storms, harsh winters, and changes in technology. This true story focuses on Harriet’s commitment and determination to fulfilling her charge and living life on her own terms. Excerpts from her actual log are included.

Image result for elizabeth started all the trouble

She couldn’t go to college. She couldn’t become a politician. She couldn’t even vote. But Elizabeth Cady Stanton didn’t let that stop her. She called on women across the nation to stand together and demand to be treated as equal to men—and that included the right to vote. It took nearly seventy-five years and generations of women fighting for their rights through words, through action, and through pure determination . . . for things to slowly begin to change.

Wonder Women provides thought-provoking profiles that introduces world-changing women of history, as well as connecting the impact of their work to the work of women in STEM fields today,

Synopsis taken from Google

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